COVID-19 Emergency Fund for Journalists – National Geographic

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY
Please note: This call for proposals will be reviewed on a rolling basis. The final deadline for applications is November 15, 2020. We aim to send out decisions every two weeks, but the volume of submissions might slow that process at times.

In the most difficult of times, journalism can play several roles in supporting communities around the globe. It can disseminate critical information to keep people safe and informed, it can illuminate stories that bring us hope and remind us of our shared human experience, and it can help us find and share solutions to wicked problems. 

As COVID-19 continues to evolve and impact communities around the globe, the National Geographic Society is launching an emergency fund for journalists all over the world who wish to cover COVID-19 within their own communities. This fund will place particular emphasis on delivering news to underserved populations, particularly where there is a dearth of evidence-based information getting to those who need it. We are interested in local and even hyper-local distribution models. This fund is designed to quickly deliver support so that both individual stories and longer series of content may be created. 

The fund will distribute support ranging from $1,000–8,000 USD for local coverage of the preparation, response, and impact of this global pandemic as seen through evidence-based reporting. Beyond reporting on medical and physical health related to COVID-19, we especially encourage reporting that covers social, emotional, economic, and equity issues. Narratives around the Pandemic necessarily include facts and numbers, but ultimately, must also go deeper—telling the stories of inequities that COVID-19 has brought to light.

We seek writers, photographers, videographers, audio journalists, cartographers, filmmakers, and data visualization experts to apply for this funding. Journalists should seek placement of this work within their local media ecosystems and must attribute their support to the National Geographic Society’s Emergency Fund for Journalists. However, you do not need to submit any formal commitments of publication or letters of support from editors or publishers. National Geographic Society or National Geographic Partners may also choose to publish some of this work as part of its global coverage. 

Reporting may cover any aspect of the virus and its fallout, including but not limited to: 

  • Social consequences of COVID-19 and measures to contain it, particularly related to equity—such as its impact on immigrant communities, domestic violence, and early childhood education. 
  • Stories of resilience and solutions that could be applied on a regional or global scale.
  • Novel forms of data visualization or science communication to help communities better understand how to protect themselves.
  • Lessons learned from local response(s) to COVID-19 that could be applied to other large-scale challenges, such as climate change or the refugee crisis. 
  • Best practices of how educators, students, and schools are reacting to this crisis, particularly as they illuminate under-resourced schools. 

Priority communities include: Those at high risk or hit especially hard by the virus, indigenous communities, immigrant or refugee communities, underserved, urban, rural, elderly populations, and children. 

Applicants may use up to 100 percent of their budget as personal reimbursement for their reporting time. We ask that applicants estimate their standard fee for reporting on or creating such content.

We also ask that recipients of this funding prioritize the health of yourselves and the communities in which you work. Many journalists are accustomed to putting themselves in harm’s way in pursuit of a story. We ask that you not only consider all precautions to protect yourself, but that of the people you are covering as well. Please follow local, regional, and national guidelines in terms of access for accredited journalists in your region. This guide provides advice for visual and other journalists. 

Finally, all reporting must be fact-based and accurate. For the best and most up to date COVID-19 resources, see below: 

All application materials must be in English, and applicants must be at least 18 years old at the time they submit an application. Normally, we require a project start date six months after application submission, but for this fund, immediate start dates are acceptable.

Call for submissions to new magazine Insurrectionist

Insurrectionist is a new East African magazine established by a network of radical theorists, organizers, intellectuals, and visionaries. The magazine nurtures left, radical, queer, feminist, and Pan-Afrikan theory and practice. It also highlights and analyzes the resistance of East Africans to capitalism, dictatorship, and other forms of oppression.

Insurrectionist welcomes pitches for its first issue. Share your ideas for articles, photographs, art, and other content with SUBMITtoINS@gmail.com ideally before September 25. Selected submissions will be modestly compensated.

Funding for story concepts, OSIEA, deadline 14 August

Open Society Institute for Eastern Africa:

Call on creatives across Eastern Africa to submit concepts on story ideas:

COVID-19 and Eastern Africa’s Stories of Innovation, Resilience and Solidarity
Timelines/Duration: 
This will run for three months – September, October and November 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has shaken all aspects of our lives. This spans health, economic, political, social to overall wellbeing.  In the midst of all these, the people of Eastern Africa are showing great promise in the way they are responding to this pandemic, including communities banding together to support each other through this very strange times. Many Eastern African countries have ignited their innovative instincts and have been able to take measures to bridge the medical supplies and protective gears gaps in some ways.. Governments have turned to local manufacturers and innovators to bridge these gaps. Young people in Universities are innovating to produce ventilators, community members are using their skills to produce face masks that they are distributing to community members that cannot afford them, while communities in low resourced neighborhoods are banding together to support each other to access food, sanitation services and other social amenities. Helplines are being established to support gender-based violence victims, while efforts are being made by communities to raise awareness to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in communities.

These are the stories reverberating across all Eastern Africa communities—the stories of innovation, resilience and solidarity.

Our Call and Purpose

As the Open Society Initiative for Eastern Africa, we would like to capture these stories in different forms to inspire communities across the region and enable learning and action even as we race against time to battle the COVID-19 pandemic and its devastating impacts.

We are therefore calling on creatives across Eastern Africa – Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, South Sudan, Sudan, Ethiopia, and Rwanda—to share with us a concept note on how they might capture these stories.

These could be captured as creatively written pieces, photo stories, short video stories, poems, creative designs, artistic expressions or simply podcast conversations among others.

These will cover innovations in the fight against COVID-19, how communities are coping despite the challenges posed by COVID-19, the initiatives by communities to contribute towards the fight against COVID-19, the resilience in the face of the pandemic among others.

Our Approach

We will pick two creatives per country who will submit five stories each (to have 10 stories per country) on different aspects of COVID-19 pandemic. The successful creatives will use different media to present the stories for diversity—integrating photo/short video clips to the written formats, arts among others. These stories will also cover diverse settings to ensure differentiation in terms of the experiences, coping mechanisms and responses.

How to Bid

Submit a concept giving examples of stories you would like to tell regarding COVID-19 in Eastern Africa that demonstrate innovation, resilience and solidarity. Indicate in what format you would wish to tell the story and the budget/how much it would cost you to tell the story. The concept should be 500 words or less. You can suggest up to five story ideas.

Submit the concept to romondi@osiea.org and wngunjiri@osiea.org by August 14, 2020.

Microgrants – Baraza Media Lab

Micro-grants from Baraza Media Lab. (Watch for details?)

In response to COVID-19, Baraza will use some of the funds set aside for physical events to receive and review applications resulting in micro-grants being provided to local media practitioners while ensuring diversity in the recipients of the funds. The project aims to support activities including but not limited to:-

  • Grassroot coverage of the COVID-19 crisis and its impact on the broader community; elevate the voices and needs of the most vulnerable and marginalized
  • Innovative initiatives that contribute to the dissemination of and safe access to quality information related to the Coronavirus pandemic.
  • Fact-checking work that tracks or combats rumours and misinformation
  • Light-hearted, fun pieces that will inspire and uplift creative spirits in the context of the pandemic
  • Content designed to reach audiences in any medium: print, audio, video and social media

This project will test this support mechanism, measure its impact and document learnings that will be crucial as Baraza looks to provide similar, responsive support to Kenyan media practitioners.

Research scholarship, Lionel Cliffe Memorial, for African activists or scholars

Due 15 March

Call for Applications

link

Lionel Cliffe Memorial Research Scholarship

The Review of African Political Economy (ROAPE) announces a small research grants competition for African scholars and/or activists based in Africa. The competition is based on the premise that a shortage of funding for critical research is one of the problems faced by Africa-based scholars and activists wishing to carry forward a political economy agenda. In response to this, ROAPE is offering up to two small research grants (value £3000). The process of selection of proposals, as well as their expected format, is outlined below.

ROAPE is a refereed journal committed to encouraging high quality research and fostering excellence in the understanding of African political economy. A political economy approach entails a critical understanding of the social relationships, particularly the power relationships, that mutually constitute the production, distribution and consumption of resources. It requires us to ask who produces what and for whom and hence an investigation into social relations that are generated by struggles over livelihoods and exploitation of the many by the few. Radical political economy represents a form of engagement with those struggles.

ROAPE is listed in the Thomson Reuters Social Sciences Citation Index and published quarterly by Taylor & Francis. Since 1974 it has provided radical analysis of trends, issues and social processes in Africa, adopting a broadly materialist interpretation of change. It has paid particular attention to the political economy of inequality, exploitation and oppression and struggles against them, whether driven by global forces or local ones such as class, race, community and gender. It sustains a critical analysis of the nature of power and the state in Africa in the context of capitalist globalisation.

For more details about the journal and examples of published articles please click here. For other journal activities, see www.roape.net

Eligibility

Applicants should be nationals of an African country and residents in an African country. Applicants who are based in or studying outside Africa will not be considered. Priority will be given to younger scholars and activists who are not yet established and who do not have alternative source of funding for primary research. Joint applications (by two candidates or more) meeting these criteria will also be considered.

How to apply

Applications should be sent by email to the following address: lcmrs@roape.net

Please make sure that you include these words in the title of your email: ‘Lionel Cliffe Memorial Research Scholarship’.

Your application should contain:

1. A brief outline of your research proposal, consisting of:

  • a title
  • an abstract of no more than 100 words, clarifying the political economy framing of the research
  • an outline of no more than 200 words, including a section on the methodology to be adopted in the proposed study

2. your CV with:

  • relevant biographical info (name; age; sex; contact details; nationality – please specify if you have more than one nationality; current residence – please specify if you have double residence)
  • educational qualifications
  • activist experience
  • research experience
  • your current employment circumstances, including any study or internship programme you are enrolled in, with specification of your remuneration if applicable.

3. a motivation letter explaining how you meet the criteria and why you think you are a good candidate for the LCMRS

4. two full references, inclusive of position/institutional affiliation; email addresses, phone numbers and (if possible) skype contacts. If you are shortlisted, your referees will be asked to produce a reference letter on a short notice.

The deadline for applications is 15 March  2020

What happens after you apply

A selection panel will be drawn from ROAPE’s Editorial Working Group.

Selection will proceed in two stages. A short list will be drawn up. If you are short-listed, your referees will be asked to produce reference letters. You will also be asked to submit a more extended account of your research proposal (no more than 1000 words), under the same headings as above, but expanding on the research problem and the key research questions. It should also include a timeline showing your research plan and a budget of how the grant would be used. This may include costs incurred for travel, accommodation, subsistence, equipment (for example a voice recorder), research permits, research assistance, and/or photocopying and printing.

Assessment

The two successful candidates will be offered some limited mentoring to support their efforts. Mentorship will be provided by a member of the Editorial Working Group, via email and skype meetings. At the end of a one-year research period, the candidate must submit a one-page report with a summary account of what has been achieved.

The final requirement is to submit for consideration to ROAPE an article (of no more than 8000 words) based on the research funded by the grant. No guarantee of publication can be given, as the article will be peer-reviewed according to the standard procedure followed by the journal.

Payment of the grant

The grant is £3,000 and will be paid in three tranches. Upon acceptance of a research proposal, ROAPE will disburse 1/3 of the grant (£1,000) to successful candidates to contribute towards direct research expenses. The second tranche (£1,000) will be paid after submission of the first-year report. Part of the second tranche can be claimed in advance if the first tranche has been used up, upon provision of all receipts of expenses incurred upon.

The third tranche (£1,000) will be paid following the formal submission of an article to ROAPE.

Deadlines

  1. Deadline for applications: 15 March 2020.
  2. Selection of short list: 20 April 2020, with notification to short-listed candidates.
  3. Submission of extended proposals from short-listed candidates: 1 June 2020
  4. Final selection and notification to successful candidates: 1 July 2020 – payment of first tranche of grant (1/3 of the total, £1,000)
  5. Start of research period and mentorship programme: 1 July 2020
  6. First-year summary report: 1 July 2021(payment of second tranche)
  7. Formal submission of article to ROAPE: no later than 1 July 2022 (payment of third tranche)

At the end of a one-year research period, the researcher must submit a report with a summary account of what has been achieved. The final requirement is to submit for consideration to ROAPE an article (of no more than 8000 words) based on the research funded by the grant. The disbursement of the third tranche of the grant is conditional upon submission of the manuscript. No guarantee of publication can be given, as the article will be peer-reviewed according to the standard procedure followed by the journal.

If you are in doubt about your eligibility or require further information just get in touch at: lcmrs@roape.net

Call for Proposals: Reporting on Conservation and Wildlife Issues in East Africa (avg $1000 / $100k KES grant)

Published on 24 Jan 2020

Earth Journalism, Internews, USG funding

Amboseli national park

15 February 2020, 05:00 PM, EAT info.ejn [at] internews.org Apply Now

Environmental loss and degradation is a global problem, but its outcomes vary as do the ways in which people are responding. What threats are species and habitats in East Africa facing? What are the ripple effects of these threats on livelihoods and human security?   

Internews’ Earth Journalism Network is offering grants to 10 journalists in East Africa to report on issues related to wildlife trafficking, conservation and protection efforts.

Overview

Though separated by borders, Sub-Saharan Africa grapples with similar conservation issues; from poaching to land degradation to human-wildlife conflict to heatwaves, drought and other weather extremes exacerbated by climate change.

These story grants will support reporting that explores the short- and long-term consequences of environmental destruction while also informing policymakers, affected communities and the general public about ways to address these problems.

Selected journalists will receive an average of US$1,000 in funding to cover travel and field reporting costs. Stories that use particularly innovative or investigative approaches that are more costly to produce may be eligible for additional funding.

The story grants are provided as part of EJN’s East Africa Wildlife Journalism project implemented by Internews and funded by a joint grant from the US Department of Interior and the US Agency for International Development.

Story Themes

We’re looking for incisive, in-depth, solutions-focused stories on conservation and wildlife that put human experiences at the center of the storytelling. While the stories should be backed by scientific evidence and incorporate data in a simple and compelling way, they should focus on proven adaptations and responses to these challenges.

Ideas should consider but not be limited to questions such as:

  • How are communities working to conserve their immediate environments and ecosystems?
  • What new approaches are being developed or utilized to combat wildlife crime and poaching?
  • How do courts and the judiciary treat these crimes? Are changes needed to ensure more prosecutions?
  • How does law enforcement, especially rangers, deal with wildlife crime? Are they well enough equipped to deal with poachers who have sophisticated weapons and technology?
  • What role do policies play in environmental protection? What are some examples of successful regulation that could serve as models for similar places?
  • Who are the female champions and experts promoting conservation or adaptation?
     

We encourage reporters to view this not just as an environmental story and to think outside their beat, considering ways their reporting could address broader angles. For example, stories could explore the economics and financing driving the illegal trade in wildlife, or reporters could produce detailed “live action” profiles of rangers by shadowing them in the field. We also encourage the use of multimedia; applicants for long-form and multimedia narratives should include plans and budget for accompanying multimedia elements and distribution channels in their pitch.

Eligibility

Grants are open to early- or mid-career journalists:

  • From Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania and Rwanda.
  • Working for international, national, local or community-based media.
  • Producing stories for digital, print, television or radio as well as other expert media practitioners reporting for a media-focused organization.
  • With a track record of covering conservation and wildlife stories.
  • Stories can be produced in English, Kiswahili or local languages. Applicants who intend to write or produce stories in Kiswahili or local languages should also include a translation of the headline and a short summary in English for publication by EJN.

Freelancers with a demonstrable plan for publication and a letter of interest from an editor are encouraged to apply. Similarly, photojournalists and multimedia practitioners with published visual work are also eligible.

Please note that EJN and its partners and donors have the right to edit, publish, broadcast and distribute these stories freely, once they have been published/broadcast in the original media outlet. 

Judging Criteria

Applicants should consider the following points when devising their story proposals:

  • Timing: We expect the proposed story or stories to be published within three months of the application deadline, or no later than June 1, 2020.
  • Relevance: Does the proposal meet the criteria and objectives of this call? Why does this story matter and to whom? Is the main idea, context and overall value to the target audience clearly defined?
  • Angle: If the story has been covered by mainstream media, does your proposal bring new insights into the topic or offer a fresh angle? 
  • Impact: Does the proposal have a compelling narrative or investigative element that will inform and engage, draw attention, trigger debate and urge action? 
  • Innovative storytelling: The use of creative approaches and data visualization will be considered a plus.
  • Feasibility: Can the story be realistically completed within the target time frame? Is the budget realistic?
  • Diversity: We will take gender and geographical distribution into account when selecting the grantees in addition to the criteria above.

Application Process

  • Click on the Apply Now button at the top of the page. 
  • If you have an existing account, you’ll need to log in. If not, you must register for an account by clicking “Join the Network” on the top right of the page.
  • If you start the application and want to come back and complete it later, you can click “Save Draft.” To return to the draft, you’ll need to go back to the opportunity and click “Apply Now” again to finalize the application.
  • Applicants should provide a detailed budget with justification for the amount requested. Download the budget template now by clicking on this linkWe expect that proposals will largely reflect what equipment the applicant already has access to (including cameras, drones, lighting, tripods etc.) and will not consider budgets that heavily focus on procuring new supplies. Please include the cost for translation in the budget, if necessary. Please also note on your budget form if you are receiving funding from other donors for the story.
  • You must submit three samples of stories or links to relevant work. You’ll be asked to upload these once you start the application process so please get them ready beforehand.
  • Applications submitted after the deadline will not be considered.
     

APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 15, 2019 at 5:00pm EAT

If you encounter any difficulties submitting your application or have questions about the grants, please email info.ejn@internews.org.

Banner image: View of Kilimanjaro from Amboseli National Park, Kenya / Credit: Sergey Pesterev on Unsplash

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(Sustainable) Energy Journalism Competition, Hivos & Climate Tracker

FELLOWSHIP: https://east-africa.hivos.org/news/hivos-and-climate-tracker-launch-energy-journalism-competition/

Together with Climate Tracker, Hivos will be training and sending six journalists to cover the Sustainable Energy for All Forum in Rwanda, this May (26th-28th).

We are looking for six young journalists from Africa who want to make an impact in their countries by publishing about energy and help shape one of the most important debates of our time.

The Sustainable Energy for All Forum will convene experts and decision makers to take progress on what is working in the establishing of the Sustainable Development Goals and to mobilize resources and new financial instruments. A vibrant meeting place to showcase action towards sustainable energy, with entrepreneurs, community leaders, city leaders, policy makers, financiers and investors.

Your role as a fellow

As a fellow, you will receive training on climate and journalism organized by Climate Tracker, participate in group interviews with high-level officials/experts, and network with people from all over the world!

All expenses will be covered for the fellows as part of the fellowship.

After the Forum, the six fellows will be part of an eight-week-long investigative reporting scholarship guided by Climate Tracker, to have a chance to refine your journalism skills and report on the pressing energy issues of your country.

I am interested! What do I have to do?

You will need to publish and submit an article to the Climate Tracker App by March 18th, 2020

  • What do we mean by publish? You will need to write and publish your piece on the media outlet of your choice. It can be local, national, regional or international. Unfortunately, we can’t accept self-owned blog entries.
  • What should I write about? Energy access, clean energy cooking, the right to energy transition, sustainable energy for all, sustainable energy and climate change.
  • This is only for English speakers? No! You can publish in English, Portuguese, or French.

Climate Tracker and Hivos will revise the articles submitted through the platform, give you feedback and tips, and select the best writers based on the Climate Tracker rating system.

To see all information, tips and questions, you can check the competition page on the Climate Tracker website. But if you still have doubts, feel free to email chris@climatetracker.org.

Africa is a Country Fellowship to support production of original work & new knowledge in under-recognised/covered topics

Africa Is a Country (AIAC) is proud to announce the launch of our inaugural Africa Is a Country Fellowship Program, with the support of the Shuttleworth Foundation and the Open Society Foundation.

The purpose of the AIAC Fellowship is to support the production of original work and new knowledge on Africa-related topics that are under-recognized and under-covered in traditional media, new media, and other public forums. It particularly seeks to amplify voices and perspectives from the left that address the major political, social, and economic issues affecting Africans in ways that are original, accessible, and engaging to a variety of audiences.

Fellows will be writers and/or other cultural/intellectual producers who can contribute meaningfully to transforming and expanding knowledge about Africa and the diaspora. Each fellow will receive a grant of up to US$3,000 to create original work on a topic of their choice for AIAC over a 9-month period. While we expect that most fellows will produce essays and/or reporting and analysis, we are also open to work in other formats, such as photo essays, documentary videos, and more. Fiction, poetry, and fine and performing arts are not eligible for support from this program.

Topics may include (but are not limited to): work and worker rights; the climate crisis; women/gender issues; immigration/border politics; reactionary politics (neoliberal authoritarianism, xenophobia, Afro-capitalism); political alternatives to neoliberalism and state-led pan-Africanism, and social movements as well as African and diaspora history and culture. We are also open to considering important topics not mentioned here. Surprise us!

Creative Masterclass with Biko Zulu at Pawa254

This is an invitation to attend The Write Change Creative Masterclass with Biko Zulu.

Date: Friday, July 5th
Venue: PAWA254 Mageuzi Theater
Time: 8 am -2 pm.
PAWA’s objective for holding this masterclass is to leverage on the potency of creative writing to address socio-economic and political issues in Kenya.
The theme is: How to write creatively, inspired by true events, in order to inspire action. Charges are 1500/= This Masterclass will be followed by a workshop involving other facilitators who will guide the writers on different themes.

Call to Francophone African researchers & writers with women’s rights / feminist perspective, WoMin

WoMin, launched in October 2013, is an African women and extractives alliance, which works alongside movements, popular organisations and NGOs to evidence the impacts of extractives (mining, oil and gas extraction and related large scale infrastructure) on women; build women’s movements to challenge destructive extractivism; and propose development alternatives that respond to the needs of the majority of African women. WoMin has galvanized a powerful alliance bridging 11 countries across Africa. Four of these are Francophone: Madagascar, the DRC, Burkina Faso, and Senegal.

We are looking to expand our work in Francophone West Africa in the next eighteen months. WoMin undertakes research in partnership with allies in country. Our research addresses a range of themes – the right to give or withhold consent for large scale development projects; extractivism militarization and violence against women; and energy and climate change.

With this email we issue a wide call to Francophone African researchers and writers, who carry a women’s rights or feminist perspective, to express your interest in working with WoMin and its allies. We regularly contract for research at the national, sub-regional and regional level and are in great need of researchers who share our interests and our analysis. We realise that our areas of focus are quite unusual for women’s rights/feminist activists and so we are open to receiving EOIs from researchers who work in related areas or have a specific interest in building knowledge in our field.

Applicants would need to be fluent in both French and English.

Please note that WoMin does not work to advance women’s employment or interests in large scale mining. We work with women impacted by large mines who suffer land grabs, air and water pollution, destroyed livelihoods and increased violence. We are starting to explore the question of artisanal mining in which women are significantly represented.

Please share your CV and a brief indication of why you would like to undertake research for the WoMin alliance. Your emails should be directed to Georgine Kengne georgine.kengne@womin.org.za, copied to Samantha Hargreaves Samantha.hargreaves@womin.org.za.

Our deadline is close of day Monday 4 February 2019.

French and English links:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B5NIMONMAfc2WC1RU2R3eFFfMk92ZndiaUNBMWgxb3l3UHVJ

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B5NIMONMAfc2Y3hPNjlabFBsVTU5MW5NQlRiZk9ldWM5SW5z