Call for Submissions (music, poetry, art, multimedia) on Re-Imagining Democracy, deadline 2 August, Civicus

2018 INTERNATIONAL YOUTH DAY: ‘Through Arts and Imagination’

Re-Imagining Democracy: in search of silenced voices

Call for Submissions

Johannesburg, 3 July 2018 – What does democracy mean to you? How are youth in your community putting democracy into action? What do you see as threats to democracy today? What does your ideal democracy look like?

https://www.civicus.org/index.php/media-resources/news/3254-2018-international-youth-day-through-arts-and-imagination

‘Through Arts and Imagination’ is a global contest seeking bold and original creative arts submissions – music, poetry, art, multimedia – that present youth perspectives on Re-imagining Democracy.  To celebrate International Youth Day on 12 August 2018, the Youth Working Group at CIVICUS,  a global civil society alliance, would like to create space for the voices of silenced youth to be heard.  CIVICUS wants to provide an opportunity for youth to express a vision of democracy reimagined. You will not only get the chance to make your voice heard by a global audience, but you will also get a chance to help a cause of your choice!

“In a world in which our democracy and fundamental freedoms are under increasing threat, a world where the voices of young people are silenced and marginalised, we believe that it is up to this generation to re-imagine the democracy we want to live in,” said Elisa Novoa, of the CIVICUS Youth Working Group.

The Symposium hopes to showcase pieces that present what democracy means to you – what it looks like and feels like in everyday life.  We want to see that democracy is about more than just putting a ballot in a box, but instead involves actions such as: organizing, thinking and writing, working alongside others, protesting, expressing solidarity, being part of a community, and engaging locally. You are also welcome to submit your ideas and dreams about a democracy that is true to its name – ‘rule by the people’ – and how you imagine it would play out in your community.

What are we looking for?

The Youth Day Creative Symposium has three submission categories:

  • Written arts: poems, short stories, essays (500 words max.)
  • Visual arts: drawings, cartoons, paintings, photography, collages
  • Multimedia arts: short films (2 min max), songs

The submission must relate to the overall theme of Re-Imagining Democracy. Submissions should present your views and feelings on the current state of democracy and your views, as a young person, on rethinking and rebuilding it.

Your submission should relate to one of the following sub-themes:

  • Diversity- We are One! Art that celebrate, feature and empower people of many different intersectional identities (gender, race, sexuality, age, ethnicity, nationality, etc.)
  • Culture and society – Breaking Barriers for all! Art that showcases intercultural-interreligious integration and “decoloniality
  • Economic justice. Art that speaks to  solidarity economies, democratisation of labour, youth social entrepreneurship and just transition
  • Democratisation of education Art that shares a message around access to education, different modes of learning, active participation and dialogue, education of multiple historical narratives
  • Silenced/unsilenced youth – Hear my voice! The experience of driving a rights-based agenda: organising, speaking up, mobilising.

Are you Eligible?

In order to submit a piece in this contest participants and submissions must fulfill the criteria below:

  • Creators must be 30 and under by 12 August 2018
  • Submissions must respect the deadline (27 July, 2018)
  • Only one submission per person
  • Original content that hasn’t previously been published
  • Agreement with the Youth Day Symposium Terms and Conditions[1]  and CIVICUS event principles[2] 
  • Submission in English, French, Spanish and Portuguese

What’s in it for you?

  1. The top 15 submissions will be promoted on the CIVICUS social media pages.
  2. One-day workshop run by CIVICUS: World Alliance for Citizen Participation to support participants in their work to share powerful messages through creative mediums on Friday 10 August in online[1] for the top 15 submissions.
  3. Cash prize and free CIVICUS voting membership to the organisations that the top 3 symposium participants chose to donate their prize to.[2]
    • 1st place: 300$US
  4. Publication of the best (3) submission in the 2018 State of Civil Society Report.

How to submit?

Please submit your application by filling in this form: https://www.civicus.org/index.php/international-youth-day-symposium. The deadline for submissions is 27th July 2018.  For any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at youth@civicus.org

How will your submission be evaluated?

  • Creativity: The submission is created based on an original idea and the participant has showed the use of their imagination and has created something unique.
  • Authenticity: The submission is reflective of the participant’s experience, a true lived experience, or a vision of potential experience. The piece is grounded in the reality of the topic of reimagining democracy as they understand it and creatively interpret it.
  • Connection to the theme: The submission directly relates to one of the presented sub-themes and explores and relevant and pertinent issue within that sub-theme.
  • Connection to struggle & contributions to community: The submission reflects a relevant challenge that is faced by youth based on the themes. It tells a story of an initiative creating a positive outcome for a community.
  • Youth perspective: The submission presents and considers the youth voice and experience.

*Consideration will be given to ensure gender, ethnic and religious diversity of contestants.


[1] 2018 Creative Symposium partners might be able to provide a physical space to run this workshop in their cities.

[2] Participants will select in their registration form an organisation contributing towards the solution of their selected cause to donate their prize if their poem, song or short story is selected in the top 3.

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Writing Scholarship: Miles Morland Foundation

https://milesmorlandfoundation.com/about-2/

Miles Morland Foundation Writing Scholarship

It can be difficult for writers, before they become established, to write while simultaneously earning a living. To help meet this need the MMF annually awards a small number of Morland Writing Scholarships, with the aim being to allow each Scholar the time to produce the first draft of a completed book. The Scholarships are open to anyone writing in the English language who was born in Africa, or both of whose parents were born in Africa.

Grant:

Scholars writing fiction will receive a grant of £18,000, paid monthly over the course of twelve months. At the discretion of the Foundation, Scholars writing non-fiction, who require additional research time, could receive an additional grant, paid over a period of up to eighteen months.

Scholar’s Undertaking:

At the end of each month scholars must send the Foundation 10,000 new words that they will have written over the course of the month. Scholars are also asked to donate to the MMF 20% of whatever they subsequently receive from the book they write during the period of their Scholarship. This includes revenues as a result of film rights, serialisations or other ancillary revenues arising from the book written during the Scholarship period. These funds will be used to support other promising writers. The 20% return obligation should be considered a debt of honour rather than a legally binding obligation.

Qualifications:

To qualify for the Scholarship a candidate must submit an excerpt from a piece of work of between 2,000 – 5,000 words, written in English that has been published and offered for sale,. This will be evaluated by a panel of readers and judges set up by the MMF. The work submitted will be judged purely on literary merit. It is not the purpose of the Scholarships to support academic or scientific research, or works of special interest such as religious or political writings. Submissions or proposals of this nature do not qualify.

Scholarship Requirement:

The only condition imposed on the Scholars during the year of their Scholarship is that they must write. They will be asked to submit by email at least 10,000 new words every month until they have finished their book, or their Scholarship term has ended. If the first draft of the book is completed before the year is up, payments will continue while the Scholar edits and refines their work. 

Proposed Work:

The candidates should submit a description of between 400 – 1,000 words of the work they intend to write. The proposal must be for a full length book of no fewer than 80,000 words. The MMF does not accept proposals for collaborative writing or short story collections. The proposal should be for a completely new work, not a work in progress, and must be in English.

Biography:

Please also tell us in 200 – 300 words something about yourself and your background. People who reach the shortlist will be asked for further information about themselves and how they propose to write their book.

Fiction or Non-Fiction:

The Foundation welcomes both fiction and non-fiction proposals. We are aware that non-fiction Scholars may need extra time for research, so the Foundation may exercise its discretion to offer non-fiction writers a longer Scholarship period of up to 18 months.

Starting times:

 The Scholars may elect to start at any time between January and June in the year following the Scholarship Award. Their payments and the 10,000 word monthly submission requirement will start at the same time.

Accepted works:

The Scholarships are meant for full length works of adult fiction or non-fiction. Poetry, plays, film scripts, children’s books, and short story collections do not qualify.

Mentoring:

The Foundation will not review or comment on the monthly submissions as they come in. However, each Scholar will be offered the opportunity to be mentored by an established author or publisher. In most cases the mentorship will begin after the book has been finished and the Scholarship period has ended. At the discretion of the Foundation, the cost of the mentorship will be borne by the MMF. It is not the intention of the MMF to act as editor or a publisher. Scholars will need to find their own agents and publishers although the MMF is happy to offer advice.

Residency:

Please note that this is not a residential Scholarship. It is up to the Scholars what their living arrangements are during their Scholarship year.

Important Dates:

Applications  will be received between 30th June 2018 and 30th September 2018. Applications submitted outside that period will not be looked at.

FAQs

Please go to FAQs to answer any further questions concerning the Morland Writing Scholarships. Do not submit an entry until you have read and observed the requirements set out in the FAQs and enclosed the five things noted below.

All enquiries and submissions relating to the Morland Scholarships should be directed to scholarships@milesmorlandfoundation.com

Have you enclosed all five things on the checklist below? If not, do not send a submission. 

 1. A submission of between 2,000 to 5,000 words as a Word document of work that has been published and offered for sale. Please send proof of publication.

 2. A description of between 400 – 1,000 words about the new book you intend to write. 

 3. A scan of an official document showing that you, or both of your parents, were born in Africa.

 4. A brief bio of between 200 – 300 words.

 5.Please tell us how you heard about the Morland Writing Scholarships.

Newsletter from Arterial Network, Africa creative civil society network

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Arterial Network is a civil society network of artists, organisations and activists engaged in building sustainable networks, information dissemination, training, policy formulation, advocacy, research and African-centred theory, all geared towards growing and strengthening the cultural and creative sectors in Africa…

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Call for abstracts: International Conference on Terrorism & Violent Extremism

International Conference on Terrorism and Violent Extremism – CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

Theme: Changing Dynamics of Terrorism and Violent Extremism in Africa: Towards Effective Prevention and Counter Terrorism Strategies

http://horninstitute.org/conference/

HORN International Institute for Strategic Studies (hereafter, the HORN Institute) invites researchers and practitioners to submit abstracts for presentation at the international conference on terrorism and violent extremism on the theme, Changing Dynamics of Terrorism and Violent Extremism in Africa: Towards Effective Prevention and Counter Terrorism Strategies that will be held in Nairobi (Kenya), 24 -26 April 2018.

Important dates

First Call for abstracts opens: 9 January 2018

Deadline for submission of abstracts: 5 February 2018

Criteria for submission of abstracts.

The abstracts should cover one of the following topics:

  1. Preventing and countering violent extremism
  2. Radicalization and de-radicalization
  3. Globalization of terrorism
  4. Political and religious extremism
  5. Conflict dynamics in the Gulf & wider Middle East, & impact of the same on Africa
  6. State responses to terrorism
  7. Media and terrorism
  8. Terrorism financing
  9. Maritime security
  10. Protecting critical infrastructure
  11. Gender and terrorism
  12. Terrorism, trauma, and counselling
  13. Terrorism and human rights
  14. Cyber security
  15. Rehabilitation and re-integration of ex-combatants and returnees
  16. Global trends in terrorism and violent extremism
  17. Select case studies: Somalia, Nigeria, Mali, Yemen, Syria, and any other.

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Call for Papers: On Incarceration, Surveillance, and Policing

Call for Papers: On Incarceration, Surveillance, and Policing

We are pleased to invite submissions for the seventh issue of Kohl: a Journal for Body and Gender Research, slated for publication in June 2018. Young activists, independent researchers, graduate students and fresh graduates are particularly encouraged to apply. We also welcome submissions from seminal contributors in the field.

Prisons are often framed as correctional institutions, and the criminal justice system as one of protection. In framing criminalization as both protective and preventive, not only do states limit protection to the legal apparatus, but they do so in exchange of resources, silence, cooperation, and behavior that does not challenge their status quo. The creation of sexual citizenships that are coopted in surveillance and policing mechanisms contributes in the construction of a national imaginary that rests on binaries of exclusion/inclusion, as illustrated by governmental crackdowns, the most recent of which being on Egyptian queers. In this sense, surveillance and policing are not confined to incarceration or the justice system alone; they are also normalized as necessary to maintain social and institutional norms, and eventually trickle down to peer to peer surveillance. Both in the online and offline worlds, policing and surveillance respectively act as a disciplinary tool and a mechanism of intimidation and control.

For this issue of Kohl, we are looking to understand systems of criminal justice as massive machines for mental and physical isolation, including incarceration, policing, and surveillance from a feminist lens, and expose the effects of liberal reformist politics when it comes to incarceration, and the ways in which such reforms create a system where punishment is more entrenched. We are looking for papers that reclaim agency and bodily integrity and explore the ways in which bodies, movement, sexualities, and genders, among others, are controlled and commodified. We are also interested in critiques of the hegemonic state discourses, as well as those of mainstream allyship, for their disposal of bodies deemed unfit for nationhood, citizenship, and institutions, as well as notions of a virtuous morality on the one hand, and a vulgarization of sex as radical on the other.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Can we speak of a prison industrial complex in the regions of North Africa, Middle East, and South West Asia?
  • Critiques of criminalization and feminist alternatives to systems of punishment: can we speak of transformative justice?
  • The distinctions and intersections between policing, surveillance, and systems of control
  • Policing the body: torture, forced or criminalized abortions, and forced sterilizations
  • Governmental crackdowns, sexual conformity, and the new wave of detention of Egyptian queers
  • Multidimensional and non-individualistic approaches to solidarity in response to incarceration and repression: alternatives to the stereotypical imagery of genders and sexual representations and the resistance/domination binary
  • Social, digital, institutional, and peer to peer surveillance and policing
  • Policing and surveillance as punishments: clandestine work, domestic work, sex work, migrants, and refugees
  • Human trafficking and the commodification of bodies in trade
  • Sexual, economic, and racial privileges in avoiding “systems of justice”
  • Breaking the law: non-conforming sexualities and expressions, bodies of dissent, and their implications on fragile/sexual citizenship, healthcare, and neoliberal economies
  • Disability discourses in the context of war and displacement

The deadline for submissions is February 18, 2018. To submit a paper, please send your blinded piece to kohljournal@gmail.com as a .doc or .docx file, with “Submission Issue 7” as the subject of your e-mail. We accept work in progress, provided full drafts are submitted. If accepted for inclusion, please note that your paper will be translated to a second language by our team.

Kohl: a Journal for Body and Gender Research كحل: مجلة لأبحاث الجسد و الجندر is produced in cooperation with Heinrich Boell Stiftung, Middle East Office, Beirut.