Research scholarship, Lionel Cliffe Memorial, for African activists or scholars

Due 15 March

Call for Applications

link

Lionel Cliffe Memorial Research Scholarship

The Review of African Political Economy (ROAPE) announces a small research grants competition for African scholars and/or activists based in Africa. The competition is based on the premise that a shortage of funding for critical research is one of the problems faced by Africa-based scholars and activists wishing to carry forward a political economy agenda. In response to this, ROAPE is offering up to two small research grants (value £3000). The process of selection of proposals, as well as their expected format, is outlined below.

ROAPE is a refereed journal committed to encouraging high quality research and fostering excellence in the understanding of African political economy. A political economy approach entails a critical understanding of the social relationships, particularly the power relationships, that mutually constitute the production, distribution and consumption of resources. It requires us to ask who produces what and for whom and hence an investigation into social relations that are generated by struggles over livelihoods and exploitation of the many by the few. Radical political economy represents a form of engagement with those struggles.

ROAPE is listed in the Thomson Reuters Social Sciences Citation Index and published quarterly by Taylor & Francis. Since 1974 it has provided radical analysis of trends, issues and social processes in Africa, adopting a broadly materialist interpretation of change. It has paid particular attention to the political economy of inequality, exploitation and oppression and struggles against them, whether driven by global forces or local ones such as class, race, community and gender. It sustains a critical analysis of the nature of power and the state in Africa in the context of capitalist globalisation.

For more details about the journal and examples of published articles please click here. For other journal activities, see www.roape.net

Eligibility

Applicants should be nationals of an African country and residents in an African country. Applicants who are based in or studying outside Africa will not be considered. Priority will be given to younger scholars and activists who are not yet established and who do not have alternative source of funding for primary research. Joint applications (by two candidates or more) meeting these criteria will also be considered.

How to apply

Applications should be sent by email to the following address: lcmrs@roape.net

Please make sure that you include these words in the title of your email: ‘Lionel Cliffe Memorial Research Scholarship’.

Your application should contain:

1. A brief outline of your research proposal, consisting of:

  • a title
  • an abstract of no more than 100 words, clarifying the political economy framing of the research
  • an outline of no more than 200 words, including a section on the methodology to be adopted in the proposed study

2. your CV with:

  • relevant biographical info (name; age; sex; contact details; nationality – please specify if you have more than one nationality; current residence – please specify if you have double residence)
  • educational qualifications
  • activist experience
  • research experience
  • your current employment circumstances, including any study or internship programme you are enrolled in, with specification of your remuneration if applicable.

3. a motivation letter explaining how you meet the criteria and why you think you are a good candidate for the LCMRS

4. two full references, inclusive of position/institutional affiliation; email addresses, phone numbers and (if possible) skype contacts. If you are shortlisted, your referees will be asked to produce a reference letter on a short notice.

The deadline for applications is 15 March  2020

What happens after you apply

A selection panel will be drawn from ROAPE’s Editorial Working Group.

Selection will proceed in two stages. A short list will be drawn up. If you are short-listed, your referees will be asked to produce reference letters. You will also be asked to submit a more extended account of your research proposal (no more than 1000 words), under the same headings as above, but expanding on the research problem and the key research questions. It should also include a timeline showing your research plan and a budget of how the grant would be used. This may include costs incurred for travel, accommodation, subsistence, equipment (for example a voice recorder), research permits, research assistance, and/or photocopying and printing.

Assessment

The two successful candidates will be offered some limited mentoring to support their efforts. Mentorship will be provided by a member of the Editorial Working Group, via email and skype meetings. At the end of a one-year research period, the candidate must submit a one-page report with a summary account of what has been achieved.

The final requirement is to submit for consideration to ROAPE an article (of no more than 8000 words) based on the research funded by the grant. No guarantee of publication can be given, as the article will be peer-reviewed according to the standard procedure followed by the journal.

Payment of the grant

The grant is £3,000 and will be paid in three tranches. Upon acceptance of a research proposal, ROAPE will disburse 1/3 of the grant (£1,000) to successful candidates to contribute towards direct research expenses. The second tranche (£1,000) will be paid after submission of the first-year report. Part of the second tranche can be claimed in advance if the first tranche has been used up, upon provision of all receipts of expenses incurred upon.

The third tranche (£1,000) will be paid following the formal submission of an article to ROAPE.

Deadlines

  1. Deadline for applications: 15 March 2020.
  2. Selection of short list: 20 April 2020, with notification to short-listed candidates.
  3. Submission of extended proposals from short-listed candidates: 1 June 2020
  4. Final selection and notification to successful candidates: 1 July 2020 – payment of first tranche of grant (1/3 of the total, £1,000)
  5. Start of research period and mentorship programme: 1 July 2020
  6. First-year summary report: 1 July 2021(payment of second tranche)
  7. Formal submission of article to ROAPE: no later than 1 July 2022 (payment of third tranche)

At the end of a one-year research period, the researcher must submit a report with a summary account of what has been achieved. The final requirement is to submit for consideration to ROAPE an article (of no more than 8000 words) based on the research funded by the grant. The disbursement of the third tranche of the grant is conditional upon submission of the manuscript. No guarantee of publication can be given, as the article will be peer-reviewed according to the standard procedure followed by the journal.

If you are in doubt about your eligibility or require further information just get in touch at: lcmrs@roape.net

Call for Proposals: Reporting on Conservation and Wildlife Issues in East Africa (avg $1000 / $100k KES grant)

Published on 24 Jan 2020

Earth Journalism, Internews, USG funding

Amboseli national park

15 February 2020, 05:00 PM, EAT info.ejn [at] internews.org Apply Now

Environmental loss and degradation is a global problem, but its outcomes vary as do the ways in which people are responding. What threats are species and habitats in East Africa facing? What are the ripple effects of these threats on livelihoods and human security?   

Internews’ Earth Journalism Network is offering grants to 10 journalists in East Africa to report on issues related to wildlife trafficking, conservation and protection efforts.

Overview

Though separated by borders, Sub-Saharan Africa grapples with similar conservation issues; from poaching to land degradation to human-wildlife conflict to heatwaves, drought and other weather extremes exacerbated by climate change.

These story grants will support reporting that explores the short- and long-term consequences of environmental destruction while also informing policymakers, affected communities and the general public about ways to address these problems.

Selected journalists will receive an average of US$1,000 in funding to cover travel and field reporting costs. Stories that use particularly innovative or investigative approaches that are more costly to produce may be eligible for additional funding.

The story grants are provided as part of EJN’s East Africa Wildlife Journalism project implemented by Internews and funded by a joint grant from the US Department of Interior and the US Agency for International Development.

Story Themes

We’re looking for incisive, in-depth, solutions-focused stories on conservation and wildlife that put human experiences at the center of the storytelling. While the stories should be backed by scientific evidence and incorporate data in a simple and compelling way, they should focus on proven adaptations and responses to these challenges.

Ideas should consider but not be limited to questions such as:

  • How are communities working to conserve their immediate environments and ecosystems?
  • What new approaches are being developed or utilized to combat wildlife crime and poaching?
  • How do courts and the judiciary treat these crimes? Are changes needed to ensure more prosecutions?
  • How does law enforcement, especially rangers, deal with wildlife crime? Are they well enough equipped to deal with poachers who have sophisticated weapons and technology?
  • What role do policies play in environmental protection? What are some examples of successful regulation that could serve as models for similar places?
  • Who are the female champions and experts promoting conservation or adaptation?
     

We encourage reporters to view this not just as an environmental story and to think outside their beat, considering ways their reporting could address broader angles. For example, stories could explore the economics and financing driving the illegal trade in wildlife, or reporters could produce detailed “live action” profiles of rangers by shadowing them in the field. We also encourage the use of multimedia; applicants for long-form and multimedia narratives should include plans and budget for accompanying multimedia elements and distribution channels in their pitch.

Eligibility

Grants are open to early- or mid-career journalists:

  • From Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania and Rwanda.
  • Working for international, national, local or community-based media.
  • Producing stories for digital, print, television or radio as well as other expert media practitioners reporting for a media-focused organization.
  • With a track record of covering conservation and wildlife stories.
  • Stories can be produced in English, Kiswahili or local languages. Applicants who intend to write or produce stories in Kiswahili or local languages should also include a translation of the headline and a short summary in English for publication by EJN.

Freelancers with a demonstrable plan for publication and a letter of interest from an editor are encouraged to apply. Similarly, photojournalists and multimedia practitioners with published visual work are also eligible.

Please note that EJN and its partners and donors have the right to edit, publish, broadcast and distribute these stories freely, once they have been published/broadcast in the original media outlet. 

Judging Criteria

Applicants should consider the following points when devising their story proposals:

  • Timing: We expect the proposed story or stories to be published within three months of the application deadline, or no later than June 1, 2020.
  • Relevance: Does the proposal meet the criteria and objectives of this call? Why does this story matter and to whom? Is the main idea, context and overall value to the target audience clearly defined?
  • Angle: If the story has been covered by mainstream media, does your proposal bring new insights into the topic or offer a fresh angle? 
  • Impact: Does the proposal have a compelling narrative or investigative element that will inform and engage, draw attention, trigger debate and urge action? 
  • Innovative storytelling: The use of creative approaches and data visualization will be considered a plus.
  • Feasibility: Can the story be realistically completed within the target time frame? Is the budget realistic?
  • Diversity: We will take gender and geographical distribution into account when selecting the grantees in addition to the criteria above.

Application Process

  • Click on the Apply Now button at the top of the page. 
  • If you have an existing account, you’ll need to log in. If not, you must register for an account by clicking “Join the Network” on the top right of the page.
  • If you start the application and want to come back and complete it later, you can click “Save Draft.” To return to the draft, you’ll need to go back to the opportunity and click “Apply Now” again to finalize the application.
  • Applicants should provide a detailed budget with justification for the amount requested. Download the budget template now by clicking on this linkWe expect that proposals will largely reflect what equipment the applicant already has access to (including cameras, drones, lighting, tripods etc.) and will not consider budgets that heavily focus on procuring new supplies. Please include the cost for translation in the budget, if necessary. Please also note on your budget form if you are receiving funding from other donors for the story.
  • You must submit three samples of stories or links to relevant work. You’ll be asked to upload these once you start the application process so please get them ready beforehand.
  • Applications submitted after the deadline will not be considered.
     

APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 15, 2019 at 5:00pm EAT

If you encounter any difficulties submitting your application or have questions about the grants, please email info.ejn@internews.org.

Banner image: View of Kilimanjaro from Amboseli National Park, Kenya / Credit: Sergey Pesterev on Unsplash

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(Sustainable) Energy Journalism Competition, Hivos & Climate Tracker

FELLOWSHIP: https://east-africa.hivos.org/news/hivos-and-climate-tracker-launch-energy-journalism-competition/

Together with Climate Tracker, Hivos will be training and sending six journalists to cover the Sustainable Energy for All Forum in Rwanda, this May (26th-28th).

We are looking for six young journalists from Africa who want to make an impact in their countries by publishing about energy and help shape one of the most important debates of our time.

The Sustainable Energy for All Forum will convene experts and decision makers to take progress on what is working in the establishing of the Sustainable Development Goals and to mobilize resources and new financial instruments. A vibrant meeting place to showcase action towards sustainable energy, with entrepreneurs, community leaders, city leaders, policy makers, financiers and investors.

Your role as a fellow

As a fellow, you will receive training on climate and journalism organized by Climate Tracker, participate in group interviews with high-level officials/experts, and network with people from all over the world!

All expenses will be covered for the fellows as part of the fellowship.

After the Forum, the six fellows will be part of an eight-week-long investigative reporting scholarship guided by Climate Tracker, to have a chance to refine your journalism skills and report on the pressing energy issues of your country.

I am interested! What do I have to do?

You will need to publish and submit an article to the Climate Tracker App by March 18th, 2020

  • What do we mean by publish? You will need to write and publish your piece on the media outlet of your choice. It can be local, national, regional or international. Unfortunately, we can’t accept self-owned blog entries.
  • What should I write about? Energy access, clean energy cooking, the right to energy transition, sustainable energy for all, sustainable energy and climate change.
  • This is only for English speakers? No! You can publish in English, Portuguese, or French.

Climate Tracker and Hivos will revise the articles submitted through the platform, give you feedback and tips, and select the best writers based on the Climate Tracker rating system.

To see all information, tips and questions, you can check the competition page on the Climate Tracker website. But if you still have doubts, feel free to email chris@climatetracker.org.

Africa is a Country Fellowship to support production of original work & new knowledge in under-recognised/covered topics

Africa Is a Country (AIAC) is proud to announce the launch of our inaugural Africa Is a Country Fellowship Program, with the support of the Shuttleworth Foundation and the Open Society Foundation.

The purpose of the AIAC Fellowship is to support the production of original work and new knowledge on Africa-related topics that are under-recognized and under-covered in traditional media, new media, and other public forums. It particularly seeks to amplify voices and perspectives from the left that address the major political, social, and economic issues affecting Africans in ways that are original, accessible, and engaging to a variety of audiences.

Fellows will be writers and/or other cultural/intellectual producers who can contribute meaningfully to transforming and expanding knowledge about Africa and the diaspora. Each fellow will receive a grant of up to US$3,000 to create original work on a topic of their choice for AIAC over a 9-month period. While we expect that most fellows will produce essays and/or reporting and analysis, we are also open to work in other formats, such as photo essays, documentary videos, and more. Fiction, poetry, and fine and performing arts are not eligible for support from this program.

Topics may include (but are not limited to): work and worker rights; the climate crisis; women/gender issues; immigration/border politics; reactionary politics (neoliberal authoritarianism, xenophobia, Afro-capitalism); political alternatives to neoliberalism and state-led pan-Africanism, and social movements as well as African and diaspora history and culture. We are also open to considering important topics not mentioned here. Surprise us!

Creative Masterclass with Biko Zulu at Pawa254

This is an invitation to attend The Write Change Creative Masterclass with Biko Zulu.

Date: Friday, July 5th
Venue: PAWA254 Mageuzi Theater
Time: 8 am -2 pm.
PAWA’s objective for holding this masterclass is to leverage on the potency of creative writing to address socio-economic and political issues in Kenya.
The theme is: How to write creatively, inspired by true events, in order to inspire action. Charges are 1500/= This Masterclass will be followed by a workshop involving other facilitators who will guide the writers on different themes.

Call to Francophone African researchers & writers with women’s rights / feminist perspective, WoMin

WoMin, launched in October 2013, is an African women and extractives alliance, which works alongside movements, popular organisations and NGOs to evidence the impacts of extractives (mining, oil and gas extraction and related large scale infrastructure) on women; build women’s movements to challenge destructive extractivism; and propose development alternatives that respond to the needs of the majority of African women. WoMin has galvanized a powerful alliance bridging 11 countries across Africa. Four of these are Francophone: Madagascar, the DRC, Burkina Faso, and Senegal.

We are looking to expand our work in Francophone West Africa in the next eighteen months. WoMin undertakes research in partnership with allies in country. Our research addresses a range of themes – the right to give or withhold consent for large scale development projects; extractivism militarization and violence against women; and energy and climate change.

With this email we issue a wide call to Francophone African researchers and writers, who carry a women’s rights or feminist perspective, to express your interest in working with WoMin and its allies. We regularly contract for research at the national, sub-regional and regional level and are in great need of researchers who share our interests and our analysis. We realise that our areas of focus are quite unusual for women’s rights/feminist activists and so we are open to receiving EOIs from researchers who work in related areas or have a specific interest in building knowledge in our field.

Applicants would need to be fluent in both French and English.

Please note that WoMin does not work to advance women’s employment or interests in large scale mining. We work with women impacted by large mines who suffer land grabs, air and water pollution, destroyed livelihoods and increased violence. We are starting to explore the question of artisanal mining in which women are significantly represented.

Please share your CV and a brief indication of why you would like to undertake research for the WoMin alliance. Your emails should be directed to Georgine Kengne georgine.kengne@womin.org.za, copied to Samantha Hargreaves Samantha.hargreaves@womin.org.za.

Our deadline is close of day Monday 4 February 2019.

French and English links:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B5NIMONMAfc2WC1RU2R3eFFfMk92ZndiaUNBMWgxb3l3UHVJ

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B5NIMONMAfc2Y3hPNjlabFBsVTU5MW5NQlRiZk9ldWM5SW5z

Michael Elliott Award for Excellence in African Storytelling

Applications for the 2019 cycle are now open. Apply here by Sunday, December 16, 2018. 

Mercy Juma accepts the inaugural award in honor of Michael Elliott, from his widow, Emma Oxford. Photo Credit: Steven Strasser
Mercy Juma, of Kenya, accepts the inaugural award named for Michael Elliott, from his widow Emma Oxford. Photo: Steven Strasser

The Michael Elliott Award for Excellence in African Storytelling, a collaboration between the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ), ONE, and the Elliott family, honors an up-and-coming journalist in Africa who strives to strengthen people’s voices and improve their well-being.

The Award was established in honor of Michael Elliott, an outstanding editor, philanthropist and former ICFJ director, whose life was a testament to the power of storytelling to bear witness to and improve the human condition. Elliott served as a distinguished editor at The Economist, Newsweek and Time before becoming CEO of ONE. In 2016, he had spoken of his dream to establish an award that would bring together his belief in great journalism with his commitment to progress in Africa. 

From the study tour, I came back home with great ideas and tips on digital storytelling.

– Mercy Juma, 2017 Michael Elliott Award Winner (Kenya)

Past award winners include Mercy Juma from Kenya and Abubakar Ibrahim from Nigeria. Juma’s award-winning story, “Teen Mums of Kwale,” tells of primary school girls whose families make the controversial choice to let them use contraceptives even though the practice is taboo in the Muslim communities of Kenya’s Kwale County. Ibrahim received the award for his story, “All That Was Familiar,” which chronicles the struggle of two women, one from Cameroon and one from Nigeria, to find their loved ones who have been internally displaced since Boko Haram began its insurgency in those countries.  

About the Award

This prestigious annual award honors an emerging journalist in Africa who tells important stories through quality reporting.  In a special study tour organized by ICFJ, the winner spends time in U.S. newsrooms to learn new skills and share knowledge. Starting in 2019, the winner will also complete a two-week internship at the headquarters of The Economist in London. To take full advantage of the tour, applicants must speak English, even if they work in another language. The winner also receives a US$5,000 cash prize to pursue an in-depth reporting project.

Applications for the 2019 cycle are now open. Apply here by Sunday, December 16, 2018. 

Eligibility

  • The contest is open to English-speaking journalists working in Africa for print, broadcast and online news media. Applicants must have no more than 10 years of journalism experience.
  • Applicants must submit one published story that reflects top-notch storytelling about an important issue. The submission can be a feature story; an in-depth, investigative or explanatory piece; or a multimedia report or documentary.
  • A copy of the published story or broadcast clip must be submitted in English. Works in other languages must include English translations.
  • The submitted story must have been published between Dec. 1, 2017, and Dec. 1, 2018. 

A distinguished international jury selects the winner.

Realness: screenwriters residency

Only 1 month left to apply for the screenwriters residency Realness

http://digilabafrica.com/2018/01/09/opportunity-apply-for-realness-screenwriters-residency/

Initiated by Urucu Media in partnership with La Fabrique Cinéma – Institut Français, Realness Residency is a pan-African programme dedicated to developing and supporting the next generation of African screenwriting talent. Each year, the program is hosting 5 young african directors in the Cradle of Humankind near to Johannesburg, and is helping them to bring their scripts from the page to the screen ensuring that the program maintains a long-standing impact.

The residency period is a six-week focused incubation where residents write with the feedback and support of story experts such as Nadja Dumouchel, producer and co-founder of the associative platform La Scénaristerie, and producing experts such as Elias Ribeiro, producer at Urucu Media.

Residents also attend the Durban International Film Festival as participants of the Market after receiving mentorship on how to pitch their film projects.

After the festival participation, residents are given another 6 weeks to finesse their work from home. Final deliveries are submitted to Realness partners for awards consideration. Each project is eligible for scholarships to attend Locarno Filmmakers Academy, Torino Film Lab Meeting Event, EAVE Producer’s Workshop and La Fabrique des Cinemas du Monde in Cannes.

Who can apply?
– You have an up-to-date African passport
– 60 – 70% of your script is filmed on the African continent
– Your script must be fiction
– Adaptations are eligible but you must include proof that rights to the book have been acquired with your application.

How to apply?

Submissions are open until January 31st. Download the application form. Find all the informations about the residency here: http://digilabafrica.com/2018/01/09/opportunity-apply-for-realness-screenwriters-residency/

Call for Submissions (music, poetry, art, multimedia) on Re-Imagining Democracy, deadline 2 August, Civicus

2018 INTERNATIONAL YOUTH DAY: ‘Through Arts and Imagination’

Re-Imagining Democracy: in search of silenced voices

Call for Submissions

Johannesburg, 3 July 2018 – What does democracy mean to you? How are youth in your community putting democracy into action? What do you see as threats to democracy today? What does your ideal democracy look like?

https://www.civicus.org/index.php/media-resources/news/3254-2018-international-youth-day-through-arts-and-imagination

‘Through Arts and Imagination’ is a global contest seeking bold and original creative arts submissions – music, poetry, art, multimedia – that present youth perspectives on Re-imagining Democracy.  To celebrate International Youth Day on 12 August 2018, the Youth Working Group at CIVICUS,  a global civil society alliance, would like to create space for the voices of silenced youth to be heard.  CIVICUS wants to provide an opportunity for youth to express a vision of democracy reimagined. You will not only get the chance to make your voice heard by a global audience, but you will also get a chance to help a cause of your choice!

“In a world in which our democracy and fundamental freedoms are under increasing threat, a world where the voices of young people are silenced and marginalised, we believe that it is up to this generation to re-imagine the democracy we want to live in,” said Elisa Novoa, of the CIVICUS Youth Working Group.

The Symposium hopes to showcase pieces that present what democracy means to you – what it looks like and feels like in everyday life.  We want to see that democracy is about more than just putting a ballot in a box, but instead involves actions such as: organizing, thinking and writing, working alongside others, protesting, expressing solidarity, being part of a community, and engaging locally. You are also welcome to submit your ideas and dreams about a democracy that is true to its name – ‘rule by the people’ – and how you imagine it would play out in your community.

What are we looking for?

The Youth Day Creative Symposium has three submission categories:

  • Written arts: poems, short stories, essays (500 words max.)
  • Visual arts: drawings, cartoons, paintings, photography, collages
  • Multimedia arts: short films (2 min max), songs

The submission must relate to the overall theme of Re-Imagining Democracy. Submissions should present your views and feelings on the current state of democracy and your views, as a young person, on rethinking and rebuilding it.

Your submission should relate to one of the following sub-themes:

  • Diversity- We are One! Art that celebrate, feature and empower people of many different intersectional identities (gender, race, sexuality, age, ethnicity, nationality, etc.)
  • Culture and society – Breaking Barriers for all! Art that showcases intercultural-interreligious integration and “decoloniality
  • Economic justice. Art that speaks to  solidarity economies, democratisation of labour, youth social entrepreneurship and just transition
  • Democratisation of education Art that shares a message around access to education, different modes of learning, active participation and dialogue, education of multiple historical narratives
  • Silenced/unsilenced youth – Hear my voice! The experience of driving a rights-based agenda: organising, speaking up, mobilising.

Are you Eligible?

In order to submit a piece in this contest participants and submissions must fulfill the criteria below:

  • Creators must be 30 and under by 12 August 2018
  • Submissions must respect the deadline (27 July, 2018)
  • Only one submission per person
  • Original content that hasn’t previously been published
  • Agreement with the Youth Day Symposium Terms and Conditions[1]  and CIVICUS event principles[2] 
  • Submission in English, French, Spanish and Portuguese

What’s in it for you?

  1. The top 15 submissions will be promoted on the CIVICUS social media pages.
  2. One-day workshop run by CIVICUS: World Alliance for Citizen Participation to support participants in their work to share powerful messages through creative mediums on Friday 10 August in online[1] for the top 15 submissions.
  3. Cash prize and free CIVICUS voting membership to the organisations that the top 3 symposium participants chose to donate their prize to.[2]
    • 1st place: 300$US
  4. Publication of the best (3) submission in the 2018 State of Civil Society Report.

How to submit?

Please submit your application by filling in this form: https://www.civicus.org/index.php/international-youth-day-symposium. The deadline for submissions is 27th July 2018.  For any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at youth@civicus.org

How will your submission be evaluated?

  • Creativity: The submission is created based on an original idea and the participant has showed the use of their imagination and has created something unique.
  • Authenticity: The submission is reflective of the participant’s experience, a true lived experience, or a vision of potential experience. The piece is grounded in the reality of the topic of reimagining democracy as they understand it and creatively interpret it.
  • Connection to the theme: The submission directly relates to one of the presented sub-themes and explores and relevant and pertinent issue within that sub-theme.
  • Connection to struggle & contributions to community: The submission reflects a relevant challenge that is faced by youth based on the themes. It tells a story of an initiative creating a positive outcome for a community.
  • Youth perspective: The submission presents and considers the youth voice and experience.

*Consideration will be given to ensure gender, ethnic and religious diversity of contestants.


[1] 2018 Creative Symposium partners might be able to provide a physical space to run this workshop in their cities.

[2] Participants will select in their registration form an organisation contributing towards the solution of their selected cause to donate their prize if their poem, song or short story is selected in the top 3.

Writing Scholarship: Miles Morland Foundation

https://milesmorlandfoundation.com/about-2/

Miles Morland Foundation Writing Scholarship

It can be difficult for writers, before they become established, to write while simultaneously earning a living. To help meet this need the MMF annually awards a small number of Morland Writing Scholarships, with the aim being to allow each Scholar the time to produce the first draft of a completed book. The Scholarships are open to anyone writing in the English language who was born in Africa, or both of whose parents were born in Africa.

Grant:

Scholars writing fiction will receive a grant of £18,000, paid monthly over the course of twelve months. At the discretion of the Foundation, Scholars writing non-fiction, who require additional research time, could receive an additional grant, paid over a period of up to eighteen months.

Scholar’s Undertaking:

At the end of each month scholars must send the Foundation 10,000 new words that they will have written over the course of the month. Scholars are also asked to donate to the MMF 20% of whatever they subsequently receive from the book they write during the period of their Scholarship. This includes revenues as a result of film rights, serialisations or other ancillary revenues arising from the book written during the Scholarship period. These funds will be used to support other promising writers. The 20% return obligation should be considered a debt of honour rather than a legally binding obligation.

Qualifications:

To qualify for the Scholarship a candidate must submit an excerpt from a piece of work of between 2,000 – 5,000 words, written in English that has been published and offered for sale,. This will be evaluated by a panel of readers and judges set up by the MMF. The work submitted will be judged purely on literary merit. It is not the purpose of the Scholarships to support academic or scientific research, or works of special interest such as religious or political writings. Submissions or proposals of this nature do not qualify.

Scholarship Requirement:

The only condition imposed on the Scholars during the year of their Scholarship is that they must write. They will be asked to submit by email at least 10,000 new words every month until they have finished their book, or their Scholarship term has ended. If the first draft of the book is completed before the year is up, payments will continue while the Scholar edits and refines their work. 

Proposed Work:

The candidates should submit a description of between 400 – 1,000 words of the work they intend to write. The proposal must be for a full length book of no fewer than 80,000 words. The MMF does not accept proposals for collaborative writing or short story collections. The proposal should be for a completely new work, not a work in progress, and must be in English.

Biography:

Please also tell us in 200 – 300 words something about yourself and your background. People who reach the shortlist will be asked for further information about themselves and how they propose to write their book.

Fiction or Non-Fiction:

The Foundation welcomes both fiction and non-fiction proposals. We are aware that non-fiction Scholars may need extra time for research, so the Foundation may exercise its discretion to offer non-fiction writers a longer Scholarship period of up to 18 months.

Starting times:

 The Scholars may elect to start at any time between January and June in the year following the Scholarship Award. Their payments and the 10,000 word monthly submission requirement will start at the same time.

Accepted works:

The Scholarships are meant for full length works of adult fiction or non-fiction. Poetry, plays, film scripts, children’s books, and short story collections do not qualify.

Mentoring:

The Foundation will not review or comment on the monthly submissions as they come in. However, each Scholar will be offered the opportunity to be mentored by an established author or publisher. In most cases the mentorship will begin after the book has been finished and the Scholarship period has ended. At the discretion of the Foundation, the cost of the mentorship will be borne by the MMF. It is not the intention of the MMF to act as editor or a publisher. Scholars will need to find their own agents and publishers although the MMF is happy to offer advice.

Residency:

Please note that this is not a residential Scholarship. It is up to the Scholars what their living arrangements are during their Scholarship year.

Important Dates:

Applications  will be received between 30th June 2018 and 30th September 2018. Applications submitted outside that period will not be looked at.

FAQs

Please go to FAQs to answer any further questions concerning the Morland Writing Scholarships. Do not submit an entry until you have read and observed the requirements set out in the FAQs and enclosed the five things noted below.

All enquiries and submissions relating to the Morland Scholarships should be directed to scholarships@milesmorlandfoundation.com

Have you enclosed all five things on the checklist below? If not, do not send a submission. 

 1. A submission of between 2,000 to 5,000 words as a Word document of work that has been published and offered for sale. Please send proof of publication.

 2. A description of between 400 – 1,000 words about the new book you intend to write. 

 3. A scan of an official document showing that you, or both of your parents, were born in Africa.

 4. A brief bio of between 200 – 300 words.

 5.Please tell us how you heard about the Morland Writing Scholarships.