East Africa Photo Competition, Foreign Correspondents’ Association of Uganda, FES, Canon

Deadline: AUGUST 01, 2018

Visual storytellers in Burundi, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda can compete for an award.

The Foreign Correspondents’ Association of Uganda (FCAU), in partnership with Friedrich Ebert Stiftung and Canon Central and North Africa, is seeking entries for the East African Photography Award.

The contest accepts published and unpublished photographs. Images must have been taken between Aug. 1, 2016 and Aug. 1, 2018.

The overall winner will receive a a Canon 80D with an EF 18-135mm lens and her or his work will be exhibited in Kampala in October. There will be prizes for the runners-up.

The deadline for submissions is Aug. 1.

For more information on how to enter, click here.

Submission Rules & Guidelines…

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Anti-Corruption Youth Music Competition, TI & JM

FAIR PLAY Music Competition

We are delighted to announce that Transparency International and JM International have launched the FAIR PLAY Anti-Corruption Youth Voices Music Competition.

The impact of corruption on our communities cannot be fully conveyed in numbers or reports. To understand how it affects the lives of people, we must listen to their voices

Fair Play is open to original songs by young bands (members must be between 18-35 years old) on the themes of anti-corruption, integrity and fighting for social justice. Bands are invited to enter the competition by submitting their anti-corruption music videos online from now until 1 August 2018 via www.anticorruptionmusic.org.

Two winning bands will come to Copenhagen, Denmark, to participate in the International Anti-Corruption Conference (IACC) and perform live at a renowned live music venue in Copenhagen.
The winners of FAIR PLAY 2018 will be announced on the Fair Play website in early September 2018.

FAIR PLAY Anti-Corruption Youth Voices Music Competition Contact Details: 
www.anticorruptionmusic.org
www.iaccseries.org

or phone Fair Play directly
+32 2 513 97 74
info@anti-corruptionmusic.org

 

Khan Academy Breakthrough Junior Challenge: Small competition physics math science for teenagers (13-18)

Only a few weeks left to enter the Breakthrough Junior Challenge! Don’t miss your chance to win a $250,000 college scholarship.
To enter, create a short video explaining a challenging concept in physics, mathematics, or the life sciences in an engaging, illuminating, and creative way.
Anyone ages 13 through 18 is eligible. In addition to awarding a college scholarship to the winner, the Breakthrough Junior Challenge will give the winner’s teacher a $50,000 prize and the winner’s school a new $100,000 science lab. The winner also will be invited to an awards ceremony where the prize will be presented in front of superstars of science, Silicon Valley, and Hollywood.
Good luck—we can’t wait to see your video!
Onward,
Sal and the Khan Academy Team
P.S. The deadline for submissions is July 1, 2018, so don’t wait—enter now!
Khan Academy is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with the mission of providing a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere.

For nonprofits and social enterprises with game-changing ideas: Google Impact Challenge Kenya

Empowering Kenyans to drive community impact.

The Google Impact Challenge Kenya supports nonprofits and social enterprises with game-changing ideas to create economic opportunity in their communities.

Organizations apply with their most innovative proposals. Finalists get access to Google.org funding, mentorship and resources. Eligible nonprofits and social enterprises are invited to apply by July 4.

 

APPLY TO THE CHALLENGE

 

Applications open for International Development Design Summits, MIT D-Lab

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) D-Lab will be supporting three summits this year and applications are now open! International Development Design Summits Kenya is July 8 – 22nd and will bring together 36 participants from all over the world to co-create innovative, viable financial products and services that expand access in the low-income space.

What are the International Development Design Summits?

International Development Design Summits (IDDS) are intense, hands-on, community-based design trainings that bring together a diverse group of people to teach them the co-creative design process and how to prototype low-cost technological solutions to improve the livelihoods of people living in poverty.

These summits are programs of the International Development Innovation Network (IDIN), a consortium comprising MIT, Olin College of Engineering, Colorado State University, University California in Davis, KNUST in Ghana, USP in Brazil, and NTBC in Zambia. To learn more, check out their website.

During the summit, participants form teams and collaborate with community partners and other stakeholders to better understand a particular challenge in order to create a solution that fits the local context and constraints. At the end of IDDS, the summit organising team makes resources available to teams that have a promising strategy for implementing their solution.

In moving the technologies from ideas to implementation, they aim to create real ventures, not just business plans. IDDS originally started in 2007 and there have since been 22 summits in 12 different countries, involving 800+ alumni and creating over 100 successful projects / ventures.

Bringing financial inclusion to Kenya

This year is the first time IDDS will be hosted in Kenya. It’s also the first summit in Kenya that is focused on solutions which promote financial inclusion. Kenya is particularly well-suited for this because of its strong entrepreneurial culture, its emerging tech sector and its history of being a leader in financial inclusion.

Even though Kenya has seen impressive progress towards financial inclusion, there is still work to be done as the focus shifts from consumers having access to financial products and services to consumers deriving value from financial products and services.

How do I apply?

If you are interested in participating, simply complete this application form and submit it by the 15th of February 2018 at 5pm EST. They will select 15 – 40 participants and will notify each applicant on whether or not their application was accepted (soon after).

No matter your background, this summit is for you. Innovation flourishes at the intersections of disciplines – our diversity is one of our greatest strengths. ​If you have any questions, check out the IDDS Kenya website.

Call for Papers: On Incarceration, Surveillance, and Policing

Call for Papers: On Incarceration, Surveillance, and Policing

We are pleased to invite submissions for the seventh issue of Kohl: a Journal for Body and Gender Research, slated for publication in June 2018. Young activists, independent researchers, graduate students and fresh graduates are particularly encouraged to apply. We also welcome submissions from seminal contributors in the field.

Prisons are often framed as correctional institutions, and the criminal justice system as one of protection. In framing criminalization as both protective and preventive, not only do states limit protection to the legal apparatus, but they do so in exchange of resources, silence, cooperation, and behavior that does not challenge their status quo. The creation of sexual citizenships that are coopted in surveillance and policing mechanisms contributes in the construction of a national imaginary that rests on binaries of exclusion/inclusion, as illustrated by governmental crackdowns, the most recent of which being on Egyptian queers. In this sense, surveillance and policing are not confined to incarceration or the justice system alone; they are also normalized as necessary to maintain social and institutional norms, and eventually trickle down to peer to peer surveillance. Both in the online and offline worlds, policing and surveillance respectively act as a disciplinary tool and a mechanism of intimidation and control.

For this issue of Kohl, we are looking to understand systems of criminal justice as massive machines for mental and physical isolation, including incarceration, policing, and surveillance from a feminist lens, and expose the effects of liberal reformist politics when it comes to incarceration, and the ways in which such reforms create a system where punishment is more entrenched. We are looking for papers that reclaim agency and bodily integrity and explore the ways in which bodies, movement, sexualities, and genders, among others, are controlled and commodified. We are also interested in critiques of the hegemonic state discourses, as well as those of mainstream allyship, for their disposal of bodies deemed unfit for nationhood, citizenship, and institutions, as well as notions of a virtuous morality on the one hand, and a vulgarization of sex as radical on the other.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Can we speak of a prison industrial complex in the regions of North Africa, Middle East, and South West Asia?
  • Critiques of criminalization and feminist alternatives to systems of punishment: can we speak of transformative justice?
  • The distinctions and intersections between policing, surveillance, and systems of control
  • Policing the body: torture, forced or criminalized abortions, and forced sterilizations
  • Governmental crackdowns, sexual conformity, and the new wave of detention of Egyptian queers
  • Multidimensional and non-individualistic approaches to solidarity in response to incarceration and repression: alternatives to the stereotypical imagery of genders and sexual representations and the resistance/domination binary
  • Social, digital, institutional, and peer to peer surveillance and policing
  • Policing and surveillance as punishments: clandestine work, domestic work, sex work, migrants, and refugees
  • Human trafficking and the commodification of bodies in trade
  • Sexual, economic, and racial privileges in avoiding “systems of justice”
  • Breaking the law: non-conforming sexualities and expressions, bodies of dissent, and their implications on fragile/sexual citizenship, healthcare, and neoliberal economies
  • Disability discourses in the context of war and displacement

The deadline for submissions is February 18, 2018. To submit a paper, please send your blinded piece to kohljournal@gmail.com as a .doc or .docx file, with “Submission Issue 7” as the subject of your e-mail. We accept work in progress, provided full drafts are submitted. If accepted for inclusion, please note that your paper will be translated to a second language by our team.

Kohl: a Journal for Body and Gender Research كحل: مجلة لأبحاث الجسد و الجندر is produced in cooperation with Heinrich Boell Stiftung, Middle East Office, Beirut.

Submissions on gender & patriarchy: literary journal Granta

via https://brittlepaper.com/2018/01/opportunity-african-writers-submit-grantas-metoo-inspired-issue/

As a response to the #MeToo movement, Granta, one of the world’s most celebrated literary journals, is seeking submissions to its Summer 2018 issue on gender and patriarchy. Read the call for submission below from Granta Editor Sigrid Rausing. It contains all the details you need to send in your work. Good luck!

***

Dear all,

Granta 144, Summer 2018 – The patriarchy is crumbling… or is it?

As I write, #metoo has gone viral. Women and girls, and some men, are revealing the sexual abuse they have encountered. Many of the people who are now speaking out took sexual violence or inappropriate conduct for granted when it happened. When I was young, being touched up by strangers in a crowded carriage was normal. Wolf whistles from builders, too. Men exposed themselves in parks, and women were routinely belittled by male doctors and other professionals. Women in short skirts were seen as fair game – if a woman was anything other than modest and sober, she had it coming, people said, in compassion or contempt. Culture turns on a dime, we know that. Hopefully for the better, quite possibly for the worse.

This issue of Granta is about gender, about patriarchy, and about all the ways in which the culture is now creakily changing. It’s about empowerment, trigger warnings and activism. Who runs the discourse, and who is excluded and why? Is trial by public opinion ever right? Are we seeing a form of mob rule? What about innocent until proven guilty? Is #metoo a flash in the pan? Will compassion fatigue set in? Will there be a backlash, and what might that look like?

This issue is about what it means to be a woman in this world; it’s about feminist values and wit, what it means to be born a woman, and to become a woman.

We welcome submissions – fiction and non-fiction – from authors who are keen to think about these questions with us.

Deadline for submissions: Monday 2nd April 2018

Please contact editor Sigrid Rausing srausing@granta.com with ideas, submissions and proposals, copying in editorial assistants Eleanor Chandler echandler@granta.com and Josie Mitchell jmitchell@granta.com.

Best wishes,
Sigrid Rausing
Editor Granta”