COVID-19 Emergency Fund for Journalists – National Geographic

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY
Please note: This call for proposals will be reviewed on a rolling basis. The final deadline for applications is November 15, 2020. We aim to send out decisions every two weeks, but the volume of submissions might slow that process at times.

In the most difficult of times, journalism can play several roles in supporting communities around the globe. It can disseminate critical information to keep people safe and informed, it can illuminate stories that bring us hope and remind us of our shared human experience, and it can help us find and share solutions to wicked problems. 

As COVID-19 continues to evolve and impact communities around the globe, the National Geographic Society is launching an emergency fund for journalists all over the world who wish to cover COVID-19 within their own communities. This fund will place particular emphasis on delivering news to underserved populations, particularly where there is a dearth of evidence-based information getting to those who need it. We are interested in local and even hyper-local distribution models. This fund is designed to quickly deliver support so that both individual stories and longer series of content may be created. 

The fund will distribute support ranging from $1,000–8,000 USD for local coverage of the preparation, response, and impact of this global pandemic as seen through evidence-based reporting. Beyond reporting on medical and physical health related to COVID-19, we especially encourage reporting that covers social, emotional, economic, and equity issues. Narratives around the Pandemic necessarily include facts and numbers, but ultimately, must also go deeper—telling the stories of inequities that COVID-19 has brought to light.

We seek writers, photographers, videographers, audio journalists, cartographers, filmmakers, and data visualization experts to apply for this funding. Journalists should seek placement of this work within their local media ecosystems and must attribute their support to the National Geographic Society’s Emergency Fund for Journalists. However, you do not need to submit any formal commitments of publication or letters of support from editors or publishers. National Geographic Society or National Geographic Partners may also choose to publish some of this work as part of its global coverage. 

Reporting may cover any aspect of the virus and its fallout, including but not limited to: 

  • Social consequences of COVID-19 and measures to contain it, particularly related to equity—such as its impact on immigrant communities, domestic violence, and early childhood education. 
  • Stories of resilience and solutions that could be applied on a regional or global scale.
  • Novel forms of data visualization or science communication to help communities better understand how to protect themselves.
  • Lessons learned from local response(s) to COVID-19 that could be applied to other large-scale challenges, such as climate change or the refugee crisis. 
  • Best practices of how educators, students, and schools are reacting to this crisis, particularly as they illuminate under-resourced schools. 

Priority communities include: Those at high risk or hit especially hard by the virus, indigenous communities, immigrant or refugee communities, underserved, urban, rural, elderly populations, and children. 

Applicants may use up to 100 percent of their budget as personal reimbursement for their reporting time. We ask that applicants estimate their standard fee for reporting on or creating such content.

We also ask that recipients of this funding prioritize the health of yourselves and the communities in which you work. Many journalists are accustomed to putting themselves in harm’s way in pursuit of a story. We ask that you not only consider all precautions to protect yourself, but that of the people you are covering as well. Please follow local, regional, and national guidelines in terms of access for accredited journalists in your region. This guide provides advice for visual and other journalists. 

Finally, all reporting must be fact-based and accurate. For the best and most up to date COVID-19 resources, see below: 

All application materials must be in English, and applicants must be at least 18 years old at the time they submit an application. Normally, we require a project start date six months after application submission, but for this fund, immediate start dates are acceptable.

Microgrants – Baraza Media Lab

Micro-grants from Baraza Media Lab. (Watch for details?)

In response to COVID-19, Baraza will use some of the funds set aside for physical events to receive and review applications resulting in micro-grants being provided to local media practitioners while ensuring diversity in the recipients of the funds. The project aims to support activities including but not limited to:-

  • Grassroot coverage of the COVID-19 crisis and its impact on the broader community; elevate the voices and needs of the most vulnerable and marginalized
  • Innovative initiatives that contribute to the dissemination of and safe access to quality information related to the Coronavirus pandemic.
  • Fact-checking work that tracks or combats rumours and misinformation
  • Light-hearted, fun pieces that will inspire and uplift creative spirits in the context of the pandemic
  • Content designed to reach audiences in any medium: print, audio, video and social media

This project will test this support mechanism, measure its impact and document learnings that will be crucial as Baraza looks to provide similar, responsive support to Kenyan media practitioners.

Call for Proposals: Reporting on Conservation and Wildlife Issues in East Africa (avg $1000 / $100k KES grant)

Published on 24 Jan 2020

Earth Journalism, Internews, USG funding

Amboseli national park

15 February 2020, 05:00 PM, EAT info.ejn [at] internews.org Apply Now

Environmental loss and degradation is a global problem, but its outcomes vary as do the ways in which people are responding. What threats are species and habitats in East Africa facing? What are the ripple effects of these threats on livelihoods and human security?   

Internews’ Earth Journalism Network is offering grants to 10 journalists in East Africa to report on issues related to wildlife trafficking, conservation and protection efforts.

Overview

Though separated by borders, Sub-Saharan Africa grapples with similar conservation issues; from poaching to land degradation to human-wildlife conflict to heatwaves, drought and other weather extremes exacerbated by climate change.

These story grants will support reporting that explores the short- and long-term consequences of environmental destruction while also informing policymakers, affected communities and the general public about ways to address these problems.

Selected journalists will receive an average of US$1,000 in funding to cover travel and field reporting costs. Stories that use particularly innovative or investigative approaches that are more costly to produce may be eligible for additional funding.

The story grants are provided as part of EJN’s East Africa Wildlife Journalism project implemented by Internews and funded by a joint grant from the US Department of Interior and the US Agency for International Development.

Story Themes

We’re looking for incisive, in-depth, solutions-focused stories on conservation and wildlife that put human experiences at the center of the storytelling. While the stories should be backed by scientific evidence and incorporate data in a simple and compelling way, they should focus on proven adaptations and responses to these challenges.

Ideas should consider but not be limited to questions such as:

  • How are communities working to conserve their immediate environments and ecosystems?
  • What new approaches are being developed or utilized to combat wildlife crime and poaching?
  • How do courts and the judiciary treat these crimes? Are changes needed to ensure more prosecutions?
  • How does law enforcement, especially rangers, deal with wildlife crime? Are they well enough equipped to deal with poachers who have sophisticated weapons and technology?
  • What role do policies play in environmental protection? What are some examples of successful regulation that could serve as models for similar places?
  • Who are the female champions and experts promoting conservation or adaptation?
     

We encourage reporters to view this not just as an environmental story and to think outside their beat, considering ways their reporting could address broader angles. For example, stories could explore the economics and financing driving the illegal trade in wildlife, or reporters could produce detailed “live action” profiles of rangers by shadowing them in the field. We also encourage the use of multimedia; applicants for long-form and multimedia narratives should include plans and budget for accompanying multimedia elements and distribution channels in their pitch.

Eligibility

Grants are open to early- or mid-career journalists:

  • From Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania and Rwanda.
  • Working for international, national, local or community-based media.
  • Producing stories for digital, print, television or radio as well as other expert media practitioners reporting for a media-focused organization.
  • With a track record of covering conservation and wildlife stories.
  • Stories can be produced in English, Kiswahili or local languages. Applicants who intend to write or produce stories in Kiswahili or local languages should also include a translation of the headline and a short summary in English for publication by EJN.

Freelancers with a demonstrable plan for publication and a letter of interest from an editor are encouraged to apply. Similarly, photojournalists and multimedia practitioners with published visual work are also eligible.

Please note that EJN and its partners and donors have the right to edit, publish, broadcast and distribute these stories freely, once they have been published/broadcast in the original media outlet. 

Judging Criteria

Applicants should consider the following points when devising their story proposals:

  • Timing: We expect the proposed story or stories to be published within three months of the application deadline, or no later than June 1, 2020.
  • Relevance: Does the proposal meet the criteria and objectives of this call? Why does this story matter and to whom? Is the main idea, context and overall value to the target audience clearly defined?
  • Angle: If the story has been covered by mainstream media, does your proposal bring new insights into the topic or offer a fresh angle? 
  • Impact: Does the proposal have a compelling narrative or investigative element that will inform and engage, draw attention, trigger debate and urge action? 
  • Innovative storytelling: The use of creative approaches and data visualization will be considered a plus.
  • Feasibility: Can the story be realistically completed within the target time frame? Is the budget realistic?
  • Diversity: We will take gender and geographical distribution into account when selecting the grantees in addition to the criteria above.

Application Process

  • Click on the Apply Now button at the top of the page. 
  • If you have an existing account, you’ll need to log in. If not, you must register for an account by clicking “Join the Network” on the top right of the page.
  • If you start the application and want to come back and complete it later, you can click “Save Draft.” To return to the draft, you’ll need to go back to the opportunity and click “Apply Now” again to finalize the application.
  • Applicants should provide a detailed budget with justification for the amount requested. Download the budget template now by clicking on this linkWe expect that proposals will largely reflect what equipment the applicant already has access to (including cameras, drones, lighting, tripods etc.) and will not consider budgets that heavily focus on procuring new supplies. Please include the cost for translation in the budget, if necessary. Please also note on your budget form if you are receiving funding from other donors for the story.
  • You must submit three samples of stories or links to relevant work. You’ll be asked to upload these once you start the application process so please get them ready beforehand.
  • Applications submitted after the deadline will not be considered.
     

APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 15, 2019 at 5:00pm EAT

If you encounter any difficulties submitting your application or have questions about the grants, please email info.ejn@internews.org.

Banner image: View of Kilimanjaro from Amboseli National Park, Kenya / Credit: Sergey Pesterev on Unsplash

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Digital Rights Advancement Grants, Media Defence Centres

Posted on:  10 Jan 2020

https://www.mediadefence.org/news/special-call-digital-rights-advancement-grants-media-defence-centres

MLDI would like to partner with NGOs, law centres and/or independent media outlets in East, West, and Southern Africa to advance digital rights and freedom of expression online. A limited number of one-year grants are available to such organisations, for projects aimed at providing better local level access to legal assistance and support to online independent media.

As part of this project, we are offering 12-month grants of up to USD 20,000 to organisations with backgrounds in defending and supporting the right to freedom of expression. The objective of the grants is to improve local access to legal assistance for online media and bloggers in order to advance digital rights and standards in online freedom of expression and to maximise the number of digital rights cases reaching the courts. The grants can be used to set up a media legal defence unit which provides pro bono legal support to journalists, citizen journalists and independent media and/or coordinates networks of lawyers to do the same.

If required, MLDI can provide legal mentoring, capacity building, and other forms of non-financial organisational support.

Please see the attached call for applications and contact hannah.stoate@mediadefence.org  Attached files:  PDF iconSub Awards_Call for Applications.pdf

Fund: HEVA, the first creative economy catalyst program for East Africa

Sign up for more info and future deadlines: http://www.hevafund.com/

“Since 2013, HEVA has innovated financial models specifically for the East African creative economy:

“We have invested in more than 20 creative businesses in the fashion, digital content, crafts and decor value chains. From Nairobi, Kampala, Kigali, Arusha, Lamu to Dar es Salaam, the creative sector is where the creation of new products and new cultural experiences is happening. We want to be in the forefront of helping producers of cultural goods and services to build high-value, profitable businesses where new ideas will come to life, and where the highest potential for great profits, great jobs and happy people will be found.”

Call for multimedia projects: Digital Lab Africa

The Digital Lab Africa call for projects targets artists, producers, designers, start-ups, students in the media and creative industries. The call is open to anyone from Sub-Saharan Africa having an innovative project in 5 categories of multimedia production : web creation, virtual reality, video game, animation  and digital music.

DLA is looking for projects at initial stage of development, in need of partners and financial support and innovative in terms of narration, content or technologies.

HOW TO SUBMIT A PROJECT?

1/ DOWNLOAD THE CALL FOR PROJECTS PRESENTATION AND RULES

2/ COMPLETE THE ONLINE FORM

3/ EMAIL THE FOLLOWING DOCUMENTS TO APPLICATIONS@DIGILABAFRICA.COM

Email the following application files (in French or in English) to applications@digilabafrica.com before January 13th, 2019

  • Pitch deck / Presentation document (PDF, PowerPoint or Word) including:
    – project’s overview, concept, statement of intent…
    – development and production schedule, provisional budget, target audience and strategy
  • Visual element and/or research document
    – 
    Storyboard / mood board / graphics / portfolio / screenplay (for web creation, animation or VR projects
    – Game design document (for video game projects)
    – Any preview, pilot or video demo of the project (if available, for all types of projects)
  • A cover letter explaining why you want to be part of the DLA Mentorship & Incubation program (1-page maximum)
  • A resume/curriculum vitae of the applicant and/or description of the company represented
  • A picture (.jpeg) of the applicant

Applicants can submit several projects (one application form per project)
Applications submitted by two persons working in pairs can be considered.
Incomplete applications will not be considered

For any question, please contact: info@digilabafrica.com

Grants for Creative Expression for youth, Hivos

Resource Of Open Minds (ROOM) – Creative Expression in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania – Call for Concepts (youth ages 15-35 or entities that serve them), Hivos

Hivos is seeking concept notes from artistic collectives, creative hubs and groups of content creators working on creative and cultural content production in East Africa. The funding support is geared towards supporting independent content production as a way of contributing to more independent, self-sufficient initiatives that reach larger audiences. This open call is directed at initiatives currently based in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. Besides artistic imagination, the production of audio-visual, independent and conscious work that challenges or questions norms in society will be an important factor in the awarding of grants

About Hivos’ initiative on freedom of expression and the creative sector

Freedom of expression is the main measure of openness in a society, but globally, the space for free expression is dwindling. Resistance to this development is led by young frontrunners: artists, musicians, hacktivists, vloggers, writers etc. As these ‘young makers’ challenge the perspectives of older generations, they can break through the hegemonic structures in society.

In May 2017, Hivos launched its new strategy which supports makers contribution to diversification of dialogue, debate and dissent in their societies. We do this by supporting young makers like artists, designers, film makers, vloggers, men and women, who create independent cultural and media productions, which are diverse in their identities, mediums, content, channels and audiences.

Hivos wants to create a professional environment for makers, and a playground for them to experiment in. To achieve this goal, we have formulated the following short-term objectives/outputs:

  1. Creative hubs provide makers with tools, services and a community of peers.
  2. Training providers offer makers effective professional skills development training.
  3. Effective financial mechanisms are in place to support makers.
  4. Makers have been provided with the means for experimentation.

With this programme we not only provide young makers’ with the means to produce critical art and media productions, and support the creative hubs that offer them a safe work environment and meeting ground, but also hope to make a positive contribution to countering the shrinking freedom of expression in societies that have no ear for or acceptance of critical voices.

What is our target group? …

a) Young makers, men and women

b) Creative Hubs (or: communities)

Continue reading

The World’s Only Prize for Legal Empowerment

Dear Friends,

Across the globe, grassroots organizations are combatting injustice by helping people to understand, use, and shape the laws that affect them. Few of them receive the recognition they deserve. We want to change that.

In 2015, we launched the world’s first competition to celebrate great deeds in the field of legal empowerment. This year, the biennial Grassroots Justice Prize returns — bigger and better than before.

The 2017 Grassroots Justice Prize will highlight the inspiring work being done around the world to put the power of law in people’s hands. Each winner will receive US$10,000.

The Elders, UNDP, and the World Justice Project are partnering with Namati to support the global promotion of the prize as well as the selection of the shortlisted candidates and the winners.

This year’s Grassroots Justice Prize will honor the work of non-profits, social enterprises, and public institutions with three different awards:

The Achmed Dean Sesay Memorial Prize for Innovation
The Nomboniso Nangu Maqubela Memorial Prize for Scalability and Sustainability
The Elders’ #WalkTogether Prize for Courage 

Applicants can choose to be considered for one, two, or all three categories.

A panel of judges will determine the winners of the first two prizes and will shortlist candidates for the third, which will then be put to a public vote.

For more information on how to apply or nominate an organization for the Grassroots Justice Prize visit www.justiceprize.org.

The deadline for applications is Friday, November 24th. Nominations must be received by Friday, November 10th.

Support for entrepreneurs: The Somo Project

Check out their website for full details: http://www.thesomoproject.org/

The Somo Project’s mission is to identify, train, fund and mentor entrepreneurs looking to drive social change by building enterprises in their own low-income urban communities.

The Somo Project invests in people. We believe that talented local teams are best equipped to build sustainable enterprises in their own low-income communities and that these are the people who can best address the problems their communities face.

Access to stable, long-term capital is greatly inadequate and we are committed to changing this by providing long-term partnership, encouraging leaders to dream big and build scalable enterprises that otherwise would not be given a chance.

The Somo Project invests in social entrepreneurs and provides the training and tools to help them build enterprises that change their communities from within. By investing in the right people, we help break the cycle of poverty and can help bring long-term stability to urban slum areas.

Grant: new art collaborations, British Council – closing on 13 Aug!

Thank you for your interest in new Art new Audiences (nAnA) 2017. nAnA is an annual (open call) grant for 18 to 35-year-old East African and British artists, arts organisations, and art collectives, to create new art together and to showcase this art to audiences across East Africa and the UK.

If you would like to apply for nAnA 2017, please follow these three steps:

1.Download and read the ‘nAnA 2017 Applicant Info Pack’ found in our downloads section below;

2.Click on the ‘Apply Now’ button to be taken to the ‘nAnA 2017 Application Form’;

3.Once you have submitted your application, you will receive a confirmation email from the British Council confirming receipt. You will be notified on Friday 8 September 2017 if your project has been shortlisted.

Note: you will not be notified if your project has not been shortlisted.

Good luck!