Webinar: Access to Justice for the Right to Housing, Namati, Tuesday 23 April 5pm

Tue, Apr 23, 2019 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM EAT (Kenya time)
Free webinar

An estimated 1.8 billion people lack adequate housing. Homelessness and forced evictions are on the rise in virtually every country, while sanitation and access to basic services remain dire. 

In her recent report, Leilani Farha, the Special Rapporteur on the right to adequate housing, recognized that “the global housing crisis is rooted in a crisis in access to justice because without access to justice, housing is not properly recognized, understood or addressed as a human right.”

On April 23, join us for a webinar led by Ms. Farha and a group of grassroots activists to discuss findings from the report, how it can be used as a tool to advocate for policy change, and why “access to justice for the right to housing is inseparable from the right itself.”

During this webinar, we will discuss the main conclusions of the report and how it can help as a tool to advocate for policy changes and improved access to justice. A group of grassroots organizations from the global south will provide feedback on the report, reflecting on experiences from their own contexts in promoting access to justice for informal settlement and disadvantaged urban communities.

https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7087870164834075916

Grassroots groups, including Justice & Empowerment Initiatives (Nigeria), Katiba Institute (Kenya), and Civil Association for Equality and Justice (Argentina) have been at the forefront of pressing for housing justice. This webinar, organized together with International Development Research Centre, Canada, will provide space for these frontline practitioners to reflect on their experiences and catalogue the challenges and successes they’ve faced. 

Participants will explore strategies for promoting the right to housing and a broader set of social and economic rights in informal settlements — including how to foster and strengthen the voice of residents in housing rights advocacy, how to navigate collaborations and confrontations with local governments, and innovative legal empowerment approaches to unlocking the poverty penalty that batters already vulnerable groups. 

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